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End of the road for Windows Vista

Windows is killing off support for Vista.

Microsoft announced this week it was ending its support for the Windows Vista operating system.

Back in 2007, the iPhone had just been launched, but most people were still walking around with a Nokia or a BlackBerry. This was also the year that saw the launch of Windows Vista, a deeply unpopular operating system that never really gained any traction.

Well, it’s all over now: Microsoft this week announced it was ending its support and there would be no more security updates, free of paid assisted support or online technical content updates. This however is good news for the channel, as customers will need assistance in migrating to a newer version.

Microsoft said in an advisory that continuing to run Windows Vista exposed you to potential security and compliance risks and that businesses running the OS may incur a higher cost if they purchased custom support solutions.

Microsoft said for those considering upgrading a device that had been designed to run Vista, it recommended modern hardware, such as touch laptops, to take advantage of the improved user interface found in Windows 10.

It said there was a ‘migration path’ from Windows Vista to Windows 10, ‘but no direct upgrade path’.

“You will have to perform a custom install of Windows 10. This means that your files must be backed up before the custom install and then restored after the installation is complete. In addition, all applications will need to be reinstalled,” it said.

Microsoft announced the end of Vista support in 2007, so its customers could plan for their IT investments and migrations.

It said it had been working with customers and partners to help the migration from Windows Vista to a modern operating system.

“The channel is a key part of this effort and we have been working closely to make sure that they consult and guide customers running Vista to migrate to newer technology in time for the end of support measures.”

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